Some examples of research publishing for professionals

Urban Knowledge

“Urban Knowledge is an open platform dedicated to the composing of an innovative and effective system of methods and techniques for urban analysis and the sustainable support of that knowledge and expertise in a knowledge platform”. (translated from http://www.urban-knowledge.nl/about)

Screenshot from http://www.urban-knowledge.nl/

Screenshot from http://www.urban-knowledge.nl/

The site has a primary target audience of professional architects and urban planners. It has adjusted several functions and forms of presentation specifically to the usability preferences of this user group. For example, the research projects on the page can be selected according to their scale: block, neighbourhood or district, city or region, and country. If you are an urban planner for example, who is working on a small scale project, this helps in eliminating irrelevant, large scale information easily. Additionally, the projects on the page can be selected according to the type of information you are looking for: methods, theories, or case studies. As architecture and urban planning are of course concerned with space, the projects can not only be viewed in a list, but also be presented on a map, making the research visually hierarchical to the user’s situation.

Theaterencyclopedie

The Theatre encyclopedia was (is) made by the Bijzondere Collecties (Special Collections) of the University of Amsterdam. “It is the living platform with information about the present and past of theatre in the Netherlands” (translated from http://theaterencyclopedie.nl/wiki/Hoofdpagina).

This site is not so much about research publishing as it is about providing researchers and professionals alike with a resource about current and historical information about the Dutch world of theatre. Interestingly, the site was built with a Wiki CMS system, and anyone can apply for a login to start contributing to the resource. Looking through a few randomly selected items this user input doesn’t seem to create a messy whole and works rather well.

Sowijs

“Sowijs researches and shares knowledge about the successful implementation of social media in government, education, healthcare, small and medium sized businesses and business services” (translated from http://sowijs.nl/).

Sowijs.nl was created by the NHL University of Applied Sciences in the Netherlands (mainly in the city of Leeuwarden) to showcase their research on social media marketing. It is divided into a ‘publications’ section, where articles can be downloaded, and a ‘blog’ section, that reports on the articles in a brief manner.

Open!

“Open! is an Amsterdam-based publication platform that fosters and disseminates experimental knowledge on art, culture and the public domain. […] Open! works with theorists, artists and designers who contribute to the creation of an experimental and critical body of thought.” (from http://onlineopen.org/about.php)

Visiting this site instantly draws your attention to the selection menu on the right side of the page. It serves as an immediate entry point to the large archive of articles published on the site. Each title is represented on the front page, almost magically without cluttering it up. Because the articles are presented chronological way, they are even presented in a meaningful way. The small but quite fine-grained selection menu on the right of the list of articles allows users to select just those articles that are relevant to them without interacting with the texts themselves.

Screen shot from http://onlineopen.org/
Screen shot from http://onlineopen.org/

 

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